Azamra.com Coupon for Nanach.Net

Sunday, April 9, 2006

Find A Na Nach Near You

This page was created so people searching for the Emes can find a Nanach near them to help them out.

If you would like to be listed on this page please email us.
If any of the info on this page is outdated, please let us know so we can change it.

Key
Shabbos - Can have people over for Shabbos meals
Sefarim - Can sell books of Rebbe Nachman at cost price
Sticker - Has nanach stickers to give out or sell.
Tikkun Klali - Can provide a free copy of the Tikkun Haklali
Sechas Chavarim - Can meet up to discus Rebbe Nachman and Nanach
Chavrusa - Willing to study the books of Rebbe Nachman with people
Teach - Has experience in teaching the Torah of Rebbe Nachman
Van - Can take you for a day on the Na Nach van

Eretz Yisroel

Tzfas


Simcha (R) Nanach - 04-699-9145
Shabbos / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa / Teach

Gidalya (G) Nanach - 04-682-7591

Shabbos / Sefarim / Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa / Teach

Yosef (S) Nanach - 04-699-9651
Shabbos / Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa

Aharon (Z) Nanach - 052-665-6687
Sefarim / Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim

Lazer (G) Nanach - 077-234-3678
Shabbos / Sefarim / Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa

Elimelech (L) Nanach - 054-795-3161
Shabbos / Sefarim / Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa / Teach

Dovid (T) Nanach - 054-577-7592

Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa / Teach

Shmuel Dovid (R) Nanach - 052-764-9373
Shabbos / Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa


Yerushalim

Keren Store in Old City - 02 627 4116
Sefarim / Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Teach

Simcha (H) Nanach -
052 784 2437
Sefarim / Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa / Teach / Van

Shalom Aharon (D) Nanach - 050-200-6704
Shabbos / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa

Yehosua (S) Nanach - 054-841-8366

Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa / Teach

Yosef Aryeh (L) Nanach - 050-886-1610
Sefarim / Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa

Reuvain (E) Nanach - 050-411-3689
Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa / Teach

Moshe (A) Nanach - 054-816-3284 02-628-4482
Shabbos / Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa / Teach

Nekudos Tovos - 02-537-5689 050-449-1502
Rebbe Nachma's Books Shmuel Gayzee sells them from his house in Jerusalem - 50 Malchay

Chevron

Adam Nanach - 057-312-2710
Shabbos / Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa / Teach

Beit Shemesh


Nekudos Tovos - 02-999-5063 / 054-550-3546 / 052-832-5207
Rebbe Nachma's Books

Wandering Nanachs

Yisroel (B) Nanach - 054-668-3417

Sefarim / Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa / Van

Avi (P) Nanach - 052-683-6470
Sefarim / Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa / Van

Yackov (S) Nanach - 347-401-2381
Sefarim / Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Van

USA

Albany

Nissim (K) Nanach - 718-570-6765
Sefarim / Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Teach

Boro Park


Micha (M) Nanach - 917-627-7403
Sefarim / Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim

Far Rockaway - 5 Towns - Long Island

Zev (R) Nanach - 718-570-6765
Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa

Menashe (Y) Nanach - 516-432-3164
Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa

Mordechai Tuvia (R) Nanach - 516-587-0387
Sefarim / Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa

Monsey

Chaim D (F) Nanach - 845-269-0221
Shabbos / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa / Teach

Shimon (K) Nanach - 845-269-6063 (7063)
Shabbos / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa / Teach

Shlomo (E) Nanach - 845-222-7297
Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa / Teach


NJ

Lior (M) Nanach - Itm729@gmail.com
Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa / Teach


Norfolk, VA

Yishai (R) Nanach - 516-528-2214
Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim / Chavrusa



CANADA

Toronto

Uzi (S) Nanach - 416-464-2601
Shabbos / Sefarim / Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim

Alberta

Aaron (H) Nanach - 403-238-6555
Shabbos / Sefarim / Stickers / Tikkun Klali / Sechas Chavarim

Wednesday, April 5, 2006

Stories of Rebbe Nachman of Breslov

Stories of Rebbe Nachman of Breslov

Siporay Masiyos

Note: These stories were posted on NaNach.net with both the permissions of Rafi Nanach from Moharan.com and the translator Dovid Nanach. Stories are for personal use only. If you wish to reprint or distribute this translation, we can not give you permission. For that you must contact the above parties.

Siporay Masiyos

THE LOST PRINCESS
THE KING AND THE EMPEROR
THE CRIPPLE
THE KING WHO DECREED
ANNIHILATION
THE PRINCE WHO WAS MADE OF PRECIOUS STONES

THE HUMBLE KING
THE FLY AND THE SPIDER
THE RABBI
AND HIS ONLY SON
THE
CLEVER AND THE SIMPLE ONE
THE MERCHANT AND THE POOR MAN
THE
SON OF THE KING AND THE SON OF THE MAID WHO WERE SWITCHED
THE MASTER OF PRAYER
THE SEVEN BEGGERS

Other Stories

THE STORY OF TRUST
THE TURKEY PRINCE

THE STORY OF TRUST

THE STORY OF TRUST

He spoke thus: "I told one other story, about trust, and this is it."

Once there was a king, who thought to himself, "Who is there in the world with less worries than I? For I have all the good things, and I am a king and a ruler." He went to investigate this. He went in the night, and stood by peoples' houses, to eavesdrop and listen to the words of the world. He listened to the worries of each one - this one had troubles with his shop, and another had a problem for which he needed to see the King, and so with the worries of each one.

After this, he went and saw one house, partially submerged underground, its windows almost touching the ground, and the roof broken and collapsed. He saw a man sitting inside, playing a harp to which one had to listen very carefully to hear. He was very happy, and had a jug of wine sitting on the table before him. There were also foods placed before him, and he was very happy, filled with joy, and without worries at all. The King entered the house, and greeted him, and he answered. He saw the jug of wine and the foods, and how the man was filled with joy. The man invited him to drink, and he drank to the King, and the King also drank, out of affection for the man. Then he lay down to sleep, and the King saw that he was only joyful, without any worry. In the morning, the King rose, and also the man rose, and escorted him. Then the King asked him, "How did you obtain all this?" The man answered, "I can fix all sorts of things that are broken. I go out in the morning and fix things, and when I have gathered enough money - five or six gold pieces - I buy all these foods and drinks for myself."

When the King heard this, he thought to himself, "I will sabotage this." So the King went and made a declaration, that anyone who had something needing repair, must not give it to any other man to repair. Either he must fix it himself, or buy a new one. In the morning the man went looking for things to fix, and they told him about the ruling of the King. It was very difficult for him to accept, yet he trusted in the L-rd. He went and saw a nobleman chopping wood, and asked him, "Is this in accord with your honor?" The man answered, "I searched for someone to chop it for me, but could not find anyone. So I had to do it myself." He said, "Allow me, and I will chop for you." So he chopped the wood, and the nobleman gave him a gold piece. He saw that this went well, so he looked for more wood to chop, until he gathered six gold pieces, and again bought his usual meal, and was happy. The King again went near his house, peering through the window. He saw the man sitting there, with the drink and the foods before him, appearing very happy. The King then entered the house, and they had an exchange similar to the first time, and the King slept there as on the first night. In the morning, the King rose, and the man escorted him out. The King asked again, "Where did you get all this? For this requires a good deal of money."

The man answered, "It was my custom to fix things needing repair. Then the King decreed not to give any item to any man to fix. So I cut wood until I gathered enough money for all this." The King then left, and passed a decree not to let any man chop wood. When the man came to someone and asked if he had wood to be chopped, the man told him of the decree of the King. It was difficult in his eyes, for he had no money. Nevertheless, he trusted in the L-rd, and he went and saw a man cleaning a stable. He asked him, "Why would someone such as you be cleaning a stable?" He replied, "I looked for someone to clean it, but could not find anyone, so I had to do it myself." He said to him, "Let me clean it." He cleaned it completely, and the man gave him two gold pieces. Then he went and cleaned other stables, gathered six gold pieces, and again bought his customary meal, and went home, and was very happy.

The King came again to his house to see how he had fared, and he saw again everything as before. He entered the house as before, and in the morning the man again escorted the King, and the King asked him and he answered, all as before. So the King went and decreed that no man should be allowed to clean a stable. In the morning, the man went looking for stables to clean, and they told him of the King's newest decree. So the man went and enlisted as a soldier with the minister who recruited soldiers for the King. For there are soldiers who are enlisted mandatorily by the government, and there are other soldiers who are hired for a salary. He had himself hired, and he set conditions with the Minister that he would not be enlisted permanently, rather on a daily basis. Every day in the morning, he would be paid for a day's work. The Minister outfitted him immediately in a soldier's uniform,allotted him a sword, and sent him to where he was needed. Afterwards, in the evening, after having finished all his work, he stripped off the uniform, bought his usual meal, went home, and was very happy.

The King came to see him again, and saw that all was prepared before him, and that he was very happy. He entered and slept, as before. And he asked him as before, and the other answered as before. So the King went and summoned the Minister, and commanded him not to draw any money from the Treasury to pay any of his men that day. In the morning, the man went to the Minister to receive his daily pay, and the Minister would not pay him. He asked him, "But did we not agree that you would pay me each day?" He answered that the King had decreed not to pay any man that day. And all that he argued with him was to no avail. The Minister said, "It is better that I pay you for two days tomorrow, but today it is impossible to pay you." What did he do? He went and broke off a piece of his sword, and affixed a piece of wood in its place, and the difference could not be discerned from a distance. Then he went and polished that piece of metal, and bought with it his usual meal.

The King came again, and saw that his happiness was even more complete than before. He again entered the house and slept there, and asked him as before, and he explained that he had been obliged to break off a piece of the sword, and had polished it and bought with it his meal. "Later, when I get paid for that day, I will use the money to repair the sword, and the damage will not be noticed at all. For I can fix all sorts of broken things, and there will be no damage to the property of the King."

The King then went to his house, and called the Minister, saying that there was someone sentenced to the death penalty. "So call for that man who you hired as a soldier, and command that he specifically should be the one to decapitate him." The Minister did accordingly. He called him, and he came before the King. And the King commanded to gather all the noblemen, to come and see this farce: Being that there was a man who had inserted a piece of wood in place of the blade of his sword. Then the man came before the King, and fell on his knees, asking, "My lord the King, why was I called?" The King answered, "To cut off the head of the man sentenced to death." He answered him pleadingly, saying that he had never shed blood in his life, and so the King should choose someone else. But the King answered him that specifically he must shed the man's blood. Then he asked the King if the man's guilt was certain. "I have never shed blood in my life, all the more difficult it would be for me to execute someone whose guilt was not assured." The King answered that it was without question that the man was guilty, for there was certainly an accurate sentencing. "And now, it is specifically you that must spill his blood." Upon seeing that it would be impossible to sway the King's decision, the man turned to the Holy One, Blessed be He and said, "G-d Almighty, I have never shed blood in my life. If this man is not guilty, may the metal of my sword turn to wood." He unsheathed his sword, and everyone saw that it was wood, and it was an object of great hilarity. And the King saw that he was a charming man, and he let him go.


Note: These stories were posted on NaNach.net with both the permissions of Rafi Nanach from Moharan.com and the translator Dovid Nanach. Stories are for personal use only. If you wish to reprint or distribute this translation, we can not give you permission. For that you must contact the above parties.

THE SEVEN BEGGERS

THE SEVEN BEGGARS

Let me tell you how happy they were.

Once there was a King, who had an only son. The King wanted to give the kingdom to his son in his lifetime. He threw a grand party, a ball. Certainly, every time a king throws such a party, it is a great joy. Especially now, since he was giving the kingdom to his son in his lifetime, it was certainly a joyous occasion. All the nobles of the kingdom were there, and all the dukes, and they were all very joyful there. Also, the whole nation was happy to see the King granting the kingdom to his son in his lifetime, for it was a great honor to the King. And there was a very great happiness there. There were all types of entertainment: Musical bands, dramatic plays and the like. All sorts of joys were found at this ball.

When they had become very lighthearted, the King stood and said to his son, "Being that I can read the stars, and I can see that in the future, you will lose the kingdom, see to it that you do not become saddened at your fall from the kingship. Be only happy. And when you will be happy, I will also be happy. Even if you will be sad, I will still be happy that you are not King. For you are not worthy to be King if you cannot maintain your happiness when you fall from the kingdom. But when you will be happy, I will have particularly great happiness."

So the Prince accepted the kingdom with a mighty hand. He appointed nobles, dukes, governors and soldiers. This Prince was wise, and loved wisdom very much, and had very wise advisers. And he highly valued anyone who came to him with a matter of wisdom. He would grant them honor and importance for their wisdom, each one what he desired. To someone who wanted money, he gave them money. Someone who wanted honor, he gave them honor, all in reward for their wisdom. And because wisdom was so important to him, everyone began to be occupied with wisdom - the whole nation took to it. For some wanted to receive money in exchange for their wisdom, and others importance and honor. And because all of them dealt only with wisdom, they all forgot the strategies of war, for they were involved only with wisdom. Until all the citizens became masters of wisdom. Until even the most minor among them would in another country be considered wiser than all. The masters of wisdom in that country were wondrously great in wisdom. And because of their wisdom, these masters became heretics. They drew the King's son to their thinking as well, and he also became a heretic. But the rest of the people did not fall into heresy. For there was great depth and subtlety in the wisdom of the masters, so that the common people could not understand it, so it did not harm them. But the masters of wisdom and the Prince became heretics.

Now, the Prince, because he had a good character, for he was born with good, and had good and upright qualities, would occasionally reflect, "Where am I in the world, and what am I doing?" He would sigh and moan that he had fallen to such depths and had strayed so far. He would sigh deeply. But as soon as he began to use his mind, the heretical thinking returned to him and became strong again. And so it was several times, that he would remember as described above, and would sigh and groan, but as soon as he started to use his intellect, the heretical wisdom returned and gained strength again.

There came a time, when an entire nation was expelled from its land. Everyone fled. In the course of their escape, they passed through a forest, and a boy and a girl were lost: One parent lost a boy, and one a girl. They were still young children - four or five years old. They did not have what to eat. And they screamed and cried from the lack of food. After a time, a beggar approached them, carrying sacks of bread. The children started to draw close to him, and became attached to him. He gave them bread, and they ate. He asked them, "How did you get here?" They answered that they did not know, for they were young children. He began to walk away, and they begged him to take them with him. He answered them, "That is one thing I do not want, for you to come with me." In the midst of this, they noticed that he was blind. It was a wonder to them: If he is blind, how does he know where he is going? (In truth, it was a novelty that such a question should occur to them, for they were still young children. But they were intelligent for their age, and it was a wonder to them as was said above). Then he blessed them, that they should be like him - old like him - and he left them some more bread, and went on his way. And the children understood that the L-rd was watching over them, and that He had arranged this blind beggar to come to them here, to give them food.

After that, they finished the bread, and again began to cry for the lack of food. Night fell, and they slept there. In the morning, there was also nothing to eat, and they wailed and cried. Then a beggar came to them, who was deaf. They began to speak to him, and he motioned with his hands that he could not hear. But he also gave them bread to eat, and left them. They asked him also to take them with him, and he refused. And he also blessed them that they should be like him, and he also left them bread, and went his way.

Once again, they finished the bread, and began wailing again. Then a beggar came to them, who had poor speech. They began speaking to him, and he stuttered in his speech, so that they could not understand what he was saying. He could understand them, but they could not understand him, because of his stuttering. He also gave them bread, and left them. And he also blessed them that they should be like him, and went his way - all as before.

Then came a beggar whose neck was crooked, and it went as before. Then came a beggar with a hunched back. Then came a beggar without hands, and after that a beggar without feet. All of them gave them bread, and blessed the children that they should be like them - all as before.

After that, they finished the bread, and started to head toward a settlement, until they came to a path. They followed it until they came to a village. They entered a house, and the people there had pity on them, and gave them bread. They then went to another house, and they also gave them bread, and they went thus from house to house. They saw that it went well for them, and they agreed that they would always stay together. They made large sacks for themselves, and went from house to house, and went to all the celebrations as well: To circumcisions and weddings, and eventually they went to another town. They went to many cities, going door to door. And they went to fairs, and sat with the beggars, sitting on crates with collection bowls in their hands. Until these children became famous among the beggars. For they all knew them, and knew that these were the children who had been lost in the forest.

One time there was a big fair in a major city. All the beggars went there, and the two children went there as well. It occurred to the beggars that they should match the two children to be married to each other. As soon as a few of the beggars suggested this, it found favor in everyone's eyes, and the match was settled. But how would they make the wedding?! They discussed the matter, and decided that they would wait until the celebration of the King's birthday. All the beggars would go to the feast, and from whatever food would be granted to them, from that they would make the wedding feast. And so it was. All the beggars went to the King's feast, and asked for bread and meat, and also gathered the bread and meat remaining after the feast. Then they went and dug a great pit, large enough for a hundred people, and covered it with reeds, dirt and refuse. Everyone gathered inside, and held the wedding for the two children. And they brought them under the wedding canopy. And they were all very, very joyful. The bride and groom were also very happy.

Then they began to remember the kindnesses the L-rd had done for them in the forest. They cried and longed intensely, saying "How can we bring the first, blind beggar here, who brought us bread in the forest?" Then, immediately after they began longing for the blind beggar, he appeared, saying, "Here I am. See, I have come to the wedding. And I am giving you a wedding gift, that you should be old like me. For at first I blessed you so, and now I am giving it to you as a complete gift - that you should live a long life like me. And you think that I am blind? I am not blind at all. It is only that all the time in the world does not count for me more than the blink of an eye (and thus he appeared blind, for he did not look upon the world at all, because all the time of the world was for him only the blink of an eye. Therefore, looking upon this world was not relevant to him at all). And I am very old, yet I am still a young child, and I have not started to live at all. Even so, I am very old. I do not say all this in my own name - for I have the approval of the Great Eagle. Now I will tell you a story (all these were the words of the blind beggar).

One time a large number of people set out in ships on the sea. A storm wind came and broke apart the ships, but the people were saved. They came to a tower, and climbed to the top of it. There they found an abundance of food, drink and clothing - everything they needed. There they had everything good, all the delights in the world. They agreed that each one should tell an ancient story, that he remembers from his earliest memory. That is to say, what he remembers from when his memory first started to function. There were both young and old ones there, and they honored the oldest one to speak first. He said to them, "What can I say? I remember when they cut the apple from the branch." No one understood what he meant. However, there were wise ones among them, and they said, "This is surely a very ancient story." Then they honored the second one to speak.

The second, who was younger than the first, said "That is an ancient story?! I also remember that story. But I also remember when the light was burning." The others responded, saying, "This story is even older than the first." It was a wonder to them, that this second one, who was younger than the first, remembered a story older than the first. Then they invited the third to speak.

The third, who was younger, said, "I remember when the fruit started to be built. That is, when the fruit began to be formed." They responded, "This is an even older story." The fourth one, who was still younger, said, "I remember when they planted the seed from which the fruit grew." The fifth, who was yet younger, said, "I remember the sages, who designed and produced the seed." The sixth said that he remembered the taste of the fruit before it entered the fruit. The seventh said that he remembered the odor of the fruit before it entered the fruit. The eighth said that he remembered the appearance of the fruit before it was drawn upon the fruit. And I, (that is, the blind beggar who was telling all this), I was then a tiny infant, and I was also there. I said to all of them, "I remember all of those stories. And I also remember "nothing at all"." They answered, saying "This is a truly ancient story, older than all the others!" And it was a great novelty to them, that an infant would remember more than all of them.

In the course of this, a great eagle came and knocked upon the tower, saying to them, "Give up being poor, return to your treasures, and use them." He told them to exit the tower according to their age - the oldest ones should come out first. He brought everyone out of the tower. First he brought out the infant, for in truth he was older than all of them. Thus, all who were younger, he brought out first. And the extremely old man came out last. For all who were younger, were older, as was explained before. And the oldest among them was the youngest of all.

The eagle said to them, "I will explain the stories that each one told. The one who said he remembers when they cut the apple from the tree, he meant he remembers when they cut his umbilical cord. (That is to say, he also remembered this story that happened at the moment of his birth, at the time when they cut his cord). The second who said he remembers when the light was burning. He meant he remembers when he was still in the womb, and a light was shining above his head. The one who said he remembers the time when the fruit started forming, he was referring to when the body started to be formed, the creation of the fetus. The one who remembered when they were bringing the seed to be planted, he meant the moment when the seed passed through during the intercourse of the parents. The one who said he remembers the sages who produced the seed, he meant the time when the drop of seed was still in the mind (for the mind produces the seed). The one who remembers the taste, that is referring to the vital life-force. The odor refers to the spirit. And the image, the soul. And the infant who said he remembers nothing - that is higher than all else. For he remembers what came before the life-force, the spirit and the soul - the aspect of "nothing".

The eagle said to them, "Return to your ships, which are really your bodies which were broken, that they be renewed and rebuilt. Now, return to them and bless them." And to me (the blind beggar, that had been a child then, who was telling all this), the great eagle said, "You come with me, for you are like me. For you are `very old and yet still very young'. I am also so, for I am very old, and yet I am still young." This shows that I have the testimony of the Great Eagle, that I live a long life. And now I am giving you my long life, as a wedding gift." And there was overwhelming, immense happiness and gladness.

On the second of the seven days of celebration (According to Jewish custom, the six days following a wedding are considered a continuation of the wedding, and on each day, the couple and their friends participate in a festive meal), the couple thought about the second beggar. That is, the deaf one, who had also given them bread in the forest. They cried and bemoaned, "How can we bring here the deaf beggar who sustained us?" As they were longing for him, he appeared, saying "Here I am!" He fell upon them and kissed them, and said, "Now I am bestowing on you as a gift, that you should be like me, that you should live a good life like me. For at first I blessed you with this. But now I am giving you my good life as a full wedding gift. And you think that I am deaf? I am not deaf at all! Only that the whole world is not worth anything to me, that I should listen to their lackings. For all the voices come from lacking - each one cries about what he lacks. And even all the celebrations in the world are due to lackings - the person is joyful about a lack that has been fulfilled. And for me, the whole world amounts to nothing, that I should listen to their lackings. For I live a good life that has nothing lacking. And I have testimony to this, that I live a good life, from the Country of Wealth. And its good life, is that they eat bread and drink water." Then he recounted:

For there is a country with great wealth, and they have massive treasuries. One time they gathered together, and each one boasted about his good life, and each one described the quality of his good life. I spoke up and said, "I live a good life, that is better than your good life. Here is the proof: If you really live a good life, let us see if you can save a particular country. There was a country with a garden. In this garden were fruits with every kind of taste in the world. Also, there were all the varieties of scent in the world. And all the varieties of images, all the colors, and all the species of flowers in the world, all in this one garden.

And tending the garden was a gardener. And the people of the country lived a good life due to that garden. Then the gardener was lost. And all that had been in the garden, inevitably withered and was lost, since the overseer, that is the gardener, was not present. Even so, the people were able to survive from the weeds in the garden. Then a cruel king came to this country, but he could not do them any harm. So he went and ruined the good life that the country had had from the garden. Not that he ruined the garden. He only left three groups of servants in the country, and ordered them to follow the instructions he would give. And through this he despoiled the taste. So that through what they did there, whatever taste a person wanted to taste, he would only taste a rotten carcass. In the same way, they despoiled the scents. So that all the varieties of scents smelled like galbanum (a foul smelling plant). And so they corrupted the sense of vision - they darkened the eyes of all, as if there were dark clouds (it was all through what the servants did, following the commands of the cruel king). So now, if you really live a good life, let us see if you can save them. And I warn you, that if you do not save them, the corruptions of that country could harm you as well."

So these wealthy people went to that country, and I also went with them. Also along the way, each one of them lived his good life, for each one had his own treasury. But as they neared the country, their sense of taste and their other senses also began to fail, and they sensed the corruption of their senses. I said to them, "If even now, before you have entered the country, your senses are already failing, what will be when you enter? And furthermore, how do you expect to be able to save them?" Then I took my bread and water, and gave it to them. And they sensed in my bread and water all the tastes (and even all the smells, etc.) And so their damaged senses were restored.

Meanwhile, the people of the country wherein was the garden, began to reflect on how to repair the corruption of the senses that had befallen them. And they concluded, "Being that there is a country of wealth. And it appears that our lost gardener (who helped us have a good life), is from the same root as these citizens of the wealthy country, who also have a good life. Let us send for help to this country, and they certainly will save us." And so they did. They sent messengers to that country of wealth, and the messengers came upon the group from the wealthy country that was headed toward them. The wealthy travellers asked the messengers, "Where are you going?" The messengers replied, "We are travelling to the Country of Wealth, that they should save us." The wealthy ones answered, "We ourselves are from that country, and we were headed toward you." Then I said to them (the deaf beggar said to the wealthy travellers): "Look, you need me. For you cannot save them on your own. Stay here, and I will go with the messengers, to save their country."

So I went with them. Once in the country, I came to a certain city. I saw there that people would come and say various words of mockery. Then other people would join up with them, until it became a large gathering. And all of them chattered words of ridicule, and smiled and laughed. I focused my attention more closely, and heard they were speaking profanities. One would say a profanity, another would say the same in more refined language, one would laugh and another would derive some gain from it, and so on. Then I went onward to another city. I saw two people arguing over some business dealing. They went to court for a judgment, and the court ruled that one was guilty and the other innocent. Then they left the court, and began arguing again. They said they did not want to accept that court, and wanted to go to another. So they chose another court. So they brought their case to the new court. This court gave them a ruling, and afterwards one of the defendants began arguing with someone else, and they chose yet another court. And so they went on bickering and squabbling one with another, and continually chose new courts, until the whole city was brimming with courts. And I saw that all this was because there was no truth there. First a judge would pervert the judgment and favor one over another, and then the one he had favored would favor him. For everything here was based on bribery, and there was no truth among them.

After that, I saw that they were full of sexual immorality. There was illicit sexuality among them to the point that it became acceptable to them. I told them it was because of this that their taste, scent and vision had been corrupted. For that cruel king had left behind three groups of servants, as mentioned above, and they went and sabotaged the state. For they spoke foul language among the people, and through this the sense of taste was corrupted. So that all the tastes were that of a carcass. And so also, they brought bribery into the country, and through this, the peoples' eyes were darkened and vision was corrupted, for "Bribery blinds the eyes of sages." Further, they brought sexual immorality into the country, and through this the sense of smell was corrupted (look at other sources from Rabbi Nachman, which explain that through sexual immorality, the sense of smell is damaged). Thus, work to rid these three sins from the country, and to search after these evil ones and expel them. Then, when you have cleared the country from these three sins, not only will the taste, vision and scent be repaired, but also the lost gardener will be found again.

So they did accordingly, and began to purify the country of these three sins. They searched for the servants of the evil king. They would seize some man and ask him, "How did you come here?" Until they identified all the servants, and banished them. And they cleared the country of the three sins. Presently, a commotion arose. People started asking, "Could it be that in spite of everything, this madman who goes about saying he is the gardener, and everyone thinks he is mad, and throws stones at him and throws him out - could it be that nevertheless, perhaps he is the true gardener?" They sent for him and brought him before them (that is, before those who had overseen the fixing of the country. Also the deaf beggar, who was telling the whole story, was there). And upon seeing him, I said, "That is undoubtedly the true Gardener" (Thus, the country was repaired through him.)

Thus, I have the testimony from that Country of Wealth, that I live a good life, for I repaired that country. Now, I give you my good life as a wedding present!" Then there was very great joy and gladness there. (Thus, all the beggars came to the wedding, and gave their wedding gift. Each one, with what he had at first blessed them, now gave it to them as a gift.) The first one gave them long life, and the second gave them good life.

On the third day, the couple remembered, and began crying and longing, "How can we bring the third beggar here, the one with the impaired speech?" In the midst of this, he appeared, saying "Here I am!" He fell upon them and kissed them. He also said to them, "At first I blessed you that you should be like me, now I am giving it to you as a wedding gift. And you think that I have a defect in speech? Not at all. It is only that the words of this world, which are not praises to the Holy One, Blessed be He, are not perfected. (Therefore he seemed to be speech-impaired. For he had difficulty speaking the words of this world, which did not have perfection.) But in truth, my speech is not impaired at all. On the contrary, I am a wondrous orator and speaker. And I can recite wonderful riddles and songs, to the point that there is no one in the world who would not want to listen to me. And in these riddles and songs that I know are contained all the wisdoms. And I have a testimony for this from the great man called the True Man of Kindness. And there is an entire story to this.

"For one time, all the sages sat together, and each one gloried in his wisdom. One of them boasted that with his wisdom, he had invented iron, and another boasted of another type of metal. Another boasted at having invented silver, which is more valuable. Another one boasted about inventing gold, and another about weapons of war. Another claimed he knew how to make those metals, through means of alchemy. Another boasted of another wisdom. For there are a number of inventions that came to the world through wisdom, such as metal forging and gunpowder, and so on. And each one boasted of his wisdom.

Then one of them spoke up and said, "I am wiser than you, for I am wise like the day." They did not understand what he meant by "wise like the day". He explained, "All your wisdoms can be gathered together, and they will not amount to more than an hour. Even though each wisdom is taken from a different day, according to the creation that was on that day. For all the wisdoms are assemblies (thus, a wisdom is taken from the day on which the thing from which the wisdom is assembled was created). Even so, it is possible through wisdom, to gather all the wisdoms into one hour. But I am wise as an entire day (all these were the words of the last sage who spoke)." Then I spoke up, and said to him (that is, the one with the speech defect said to the last sage): Like which day?" The last sage answered, "This one is wiser than me, because he asks which day. All the same, I am as wise as any day you choose. Now it may seem difficult: How could the one who asked the question be wiser, if the last sage was as wise as any day you could choose? For this, there is an entire story.

For this True Man of Kindness was in fact a very great man. And the one with the heavy speech goes and gathers all the kindnesses of truth, and brings them to this True Man of Kindness. And time is principally created by kindnesses of truth (for time itself is a creation). And the one with the heavy speech goes and collects all the kindnesses of truth and brings them to the True Man of Kindness.

And there is a mountain, and on it stands a stone, and from the stone flows a spring. Now, every thing has a heart. The world itself in its entirety has a heart. And this heart of the world is a complete body, with a face and hands and feet, etc. But the toenail of the foot of this Heart of the World, it has more heart than the heart of any other. And this mountain with the stone and the spring stands at one end of the world, and the Heart of the World stands at the other end. And this Heart stands facing the Spring, and continually yearns, very intensely, to come to the Spring. With an overwhelming yearning. It cries out passionately, to come to the Spring. Also, the Spring yearns to come to the Heart. And this heart has two weaknesses: One, because the sun pursues it and burns it (for it longs and desires to go and be by the Spring). The second weakness is from the intensity of its yearning and longing, with which it constantly desires and longs, with expiration of the soul, for the Spring, and cries out. For it stands always opposite the Spring, and moans, and craves for it constantly. And when it needs to rest a bit, so that it will regain its breath, a great bird comes and flaps its wings upon it, and protects it from the sun. Then it has some relief. Even then, in its moments of relief, it gazes at the Spring and longs for it. So, if it longs so passionately for the Spring, the question can be asked, Why does it not go there? The answer is, that when it wants to go and approach the mountain, it loses sight of the slope, and cannot look at the Spring. And if it ceases looking at the Spring, it will die, for its primary life comes from the Spring. And when it stands opposite the mountain, then it sees the face of the mountain, in which lies the Spring. But as soon as it would try to approach the mountain, it would lose sight of the mountain face (this can be understood from simple experience), and then it would not see the Spring, and then its soul would expire, Heaven forbid. And if this Heart were to die, the entire world would cease to be. For the Heart is the life of all things. And certainly, there is no existence possible without the Heart. Thus, it cannot go to the Spring. So it stands opposite it, and yearns and cries.

Now, this Spring has no time, for it is not within time at all. The only time that the Spring has, is the one day that the heart gives it as a free gift. When the day draws to a close (and when the day ends, the Spring will run out of time and expire, G-d forbid, and then the heart will die, G-d forbid, and then the whole world will be annulled, G-d forbid). Then, near the day's end, the Spring and the Heart bid each other farewell, and start to recite beautiful riddles and songs to each other, with great love and very powerful yearning. And the True Man of Kindness oversees this. And when the day comes very near to its end, the True Man of Kindness gives one day as a free gift to the Heart. Then the Heart gives the day to the Spring. So then the Spring has time again. And when the day goes back to the place from which it came, it also goes with magnificent riddles and songs, containing within them all the wisdoms. And there are differences between the days: There are the distinct days of the week, and then there are the days of the new moon, and the festival days.

And all the time of the True Man of Kindness, it is all through me (the beggar with the impaired speech, who was telling all this). For I go and gather all the Kindnesses of Truth, from which are created Time (therefore, he was wiser than the previous sage, who was wise as any day one would choose. For all time and days are created by him, the one with the impaired speech, who gathers all the Kindnesses of Truth from which comes Time, and brings them to the True Man of Kindness. And the True Man of Kindness gives a day to the Heart, and the Heart gives it to the Spring, and through this the world is sustained. Thus, the main creation of Time, with the riddles and songs containing all the wisdoms, it is all through the one with the heavy speech.

Thus, I have the testimony from the True Man of Kindness that I can recite riddles and songs containing all the wisdoms (for all the time, with the riddles and songs, comes to be through me). And now, I give to you as a complete wedding gift, that you will be like me." And there was very great joy and gladness there.

When the celebration of that day ended, they slept the night, and in the morning, they began yearning again, this time for the beggar with the crooked neck. In the midst of this, he suddenly appeared, saying "Here I am! At first, I blessed you that you should be like me. Now I give it to you as a wedding gift, that you should be like me. And you think my neck is crooked? It is not crooked at all. To the contrary, I have a very straight and beautiful neck. It is only that there are vapors of this world. And I do not want to exhale any breath into the vapors of the world (and thus his neck seemed crooked, for he twisted it away from the vapors of this world, and did not want to exhale any breath into them). Yet in truth, I have a very beautiful and wondrous neck. For I have a wonderful voice. And all the voices of the world which are voices without words - I can produce all of them with my voice. For I have a remarkable neck and voice. And I have testimony to this from "that country".

"For there is a country where they are experts in the discipline of music. Everyone there is involved with it, even young children. There is no child there who cannot play an instrument. The youngest child there would in another country be considered a great master of music. The sages and the king of that country, and the members of the musical bands, are all great masters of this discipline.

One time all the sages of the country gathered together, and each one boasted of his musical talent. One said he knew how to play on such and such an instrument, and another boasted about his ability to play another, and so on. One claimed he knew how to play several instruments. Another claimed he knew to play all the instruments. One said he could create the sound of a certain instrument with his voice, and another that he could create that of a different instrument with his. Yet another boasted he could create the sounds of several instruments with his voice. One claimed that he could create with his voice the sound of a drum. Another said he could create the sound of a harp. I was also there, and I said to them: "My voice is better than yours. Here is the proof: If you are such masters of music, see if you can save these two countries.

These two countries are a thousand miles apart from each other. In both of these countries, when night falls, it is impossible to sleep. For when night comes, they all begin to wail - men, women and children. The sound could melt a stone. For in the night, the voice of the wailing is very intense, and because of this, everyone wails - the men, women and children (and so it is in both the countries). And the two countries are a thousand miles apart from each other. Now, if you are all such great masters of music, let us see if you can save these two states, or if at least you can produce their voices (that is, if they would be able to imitate the wailing sound heard there)." They asked the one with the crooked neck, "Would you take us there?" He answered that he would. So they all became inspired to go.

They went there (to one of the two above-mentioned countries). And when they arrived, and night fell, everyone began wailing, as recounted above. They sages also joined in the wailing (and they saw from this that they could not save the countries). Then the one with the crooked neck said, "At the least, tell me from where does this wailing voice come?" They asked him, "So you know?" He said, "Certainly I know."

"For there are two birds, a male and a female, and they are the only ones of their species in the whole world. The female was lost, and the male went looking for her. And she searched for him. They searched for a long time, until they lost their way, and saw that they would not be able to find each other. So they stayed where they were, and made nests. One of them made his nest close to one of the countries. Not actually adjacent, only close enough so that the voice of the bird could be heard in the country. There he made his nest. And so the female made her nest adjacent to the second country. When the night falls, the two birds start wailing with an intense cry, each one wailing for its mate. That is the wailing sound that is heard in these two countries (and because of that sound, everyone wails, and no one can sleep)." However, they did not want to believe him, and asked, "Will you take us there?" He answered that he could lead them there. "However, you cannot go there. For when you come near, you will not be able to bear the wailing sound. For even here, you cannot bear it, and you all join in with the wailing. So when you get there, you will not be able to bear it at all.

And in the day (for it is only possible to go there in the day), it is impossible to bear the joy that is there. For in the day, many birds gather around each of the two birds who are mates, and they console and cheer both of the two, with very great encouragement and joy, and tell them consoling words that there is still hope for finding the other. Until it is impossible to bear the intensity of the joy there during the day. And the voice of the birds who encourage them cannot be heard from a distance, only when one comes near. But the wailing of the couple in the night can be heard from afar. And it is impossible to go there because of this." Then the sages said to the one with the crooked neck: "Can you repair this?" He answered, "I can, for I can produce all the voices in the world. I can also throw voices. That is to say, I can utter the voice in such a way, that in the place where I am, it will not be heard at all. Only in the far distance it will be heard. Thus, I could throw the voice of the female bird, so that it would reach close to the place where the male is. Likewise, I can throw the voice of the male, so that it will reach close to the place of the female. And I would lead them to each other through this (and through this all the rest would be repaired)."

However, who would believe this? So he led them to a forest. There they heard the sound of one opening a door, closing it again and locking it with a bolt. And they heard the bolt slam shut. Then they heard him shooting something from a rifle, and sending a dog to fetch what he had shot. And the dog thrashed about and scrambled ahead through the snow. The sages of music heard all this, and looked around, not seeing anything. Neither did they hear a sound coming from the one with the crooked neck. (For he threw all these voices, and thus they heard the sounds, without perceiving their source. So they saw clearly that he could create all these voices, and also to throw them. Thus, he would be able to repair the situation described before). Thus, I have testimony from that country, that I have a very wondrous voice. And I can create all the sounds of the world. And now, I am giving this to you as a wedding present, that you should be like me." And there was very great joy and gladness there.

On the fifth day, they were also very happy. And they remembered the beggar with the hump. And they longed passionately, saying "How can we bring that hunchback beggar here, for if he were here, the joy would be very great!" In the midst of this, he appeared, saying "Here I am! I have come to the wedding." He fell upon them, hugging and kissing them. He said to them, "At first, I blessed you that you should be like me. Now I am giving this to you as a wedding present. And I am not a hunchback at all. To the contrary, I have such shoulders, that they have the aspect of "the small which holds within it the great". And I have a testimony upon this.

"For once there was a discussion, in which people were boasting of their ability in this quality. Each one of them claimed that he had the aspect of the "small which holds within it the great". There was one that they ridiculed and laughed at, and the others boasted of their possesion of this quality of the small that holds within it the great, and their words were accepted. However, I possess this quality to a degree greater than all of them. For one of them claimed that his mind had the aspect of the small containing the great. For he carries in his mind thousands upon thousands of people, with all their needs and customs, and all their being and movements - he carries it all in his mind. And thus he is the small that contains within it the great, for his mind carries so many people, as described above. And they laughed at him, saying that his people were nothing and he was nothing. Then another spoke and said, "I saw an example of the `small that holds in it the great'.

"For once I saw a mountain, upon which was heaped much garbage and waste. It was a wonder to me - how so much garbage came to be on this mountain. There was a man standing near the mountain, and he said, `All that waste came from me.' For that man dwelled next to the mountain, and continually threw upon it his garbage and filth from his eating and drinking, and despoiled the place. Until due to him, the waste and refuse piled up on the mountain. Thus, this man is the small that holds within it the great, for it was from him that the garbage grew to such a degree."

Another one boasted he had the quality of the small which holds the great. For he owns a small country, that produces a great deal of fruit. Later, when they calculate the amount of fruit that came from there, they see that the country is not as large as the quantity of the fruit. For there is not enough room in that country to contain all the fruit. Thus, it is the aspect of the small which holds the great. This found favor in the eyes of the others. For this was truly an example of the small which holds the great.

Another one said he had a very amazing orchard, in which there are fruits, etc. Many people and noblemen travel there, for it is a very beautiful orchard. Especially in the summer, many people go on leisure trips there. And in truth, the orchard does not have that much space to hold so many people. Thus it is an example of the small which holds the great. This also found favor in their eyes.

There was one who said that his speech is the aspect of the small which holds the great. For he is the secretary of a great king. Many people come to him - one with praises for the King, another with requests, and so on. And clearly, it is impossible for the King to listen to all of them. But he is able to gather all their words into brief summaries, and to tell these summaries to the King. All the praises and requests of the people are included in his words. And all the multitude of their words are alluded to within the few words of the secretary. Thus his speech is the small which holds the great.

One said that his silence was the aspect of the small which holds the great. For there are many accusers and gossipers who are maligning him very seriously. And all that they denounce and accuse him with their slanderous speech, he answers them all through his being silent alone. Thus, his silence is the small which holds the great.

Another one said he is the aspect of the small which holds the great. For there is a poor man who is blind. And he is a very large man. And the one who was speaking was very small, and he leads the larger man. Accordingly, he is the small which holds the great. For if the large blind man were to walk alone, he could slip and fall. And this small man holds him, through leading him. Thus he is the small which holds the great. For he is small, and he supports the large blind man. And I (that is, the hunchback who was relating all this) was also there. I said, "In truth, you all have an aspect of the small which holds the great, and I understand all the import of your words. And the last one, who boasted of leading the large blind man, he is greater than all of you. But I am completely beyond all of you. For the one who said he leads the large blind man, his intent was that he leads the moon, which has the aspect of blindness. For it does not generate its own light at all, and it does not have anything of its own. And he (the last one who spoke), leads the moon even though he is small, and the moon is very large. And he sustains the entire world, for the world needs the moon. Thus, he is truly the aspect of the small which holds the great. However, the aspect of the small which holds the great that I possess transcends all of you, entirely.

"Here is the proof. Once there was a group which was investigating: Being that every animal has a particular shaded area, that specifically within that place it prefers to rest. So there is a specific shaded place for every animal. For every animal chooses for itself a particular shaded spot, in which it prefers to lie. And so for each bird, there is a particular branch, on which branch specifically it prefers to dwell. And so the investigators searched to find such a tree, under which all the animals would find a place to rest. One which all the animals would choose, and desire to dwell within its shade, and on its branches all the birds would dwell. They discovered that there was such a tree, and they wanted to travel to that tree. For the magnificent delight that one would have beside that tree is impossible to imagine. For all the birds and all the animals are there, and no animal would cause one any harm. All the animals there mingle and play together, and surely it is a very great delight to be by that tree. Then they investigated which direction to follow in order to reach the tree, and they fell into disagreement about it. There was no concluding answer. For one said they needed to go East, and other said West, one said this way and one said that way. Until they could not come to a conclusion about which direction to take to reach the tree.

Then one sage came, and asked, "Why are you searching for which direction to go to reach the tree? First of all, determine who is worthy of going there. For not everyone is able to go to that tree. Only those who have the qualities of the tree can go. For this tree has three roots: One of them is Faith, another is Awe, and the third is Poverty. And the trunk of the tree is Truth. And from there extend the branches. Thus, only one who has the qualities of the tree can go there." Now this band of investigators were very closeknit, and they were not prepared to separate from each other, so that some would make the journey and some would stay. For not all of them were fit to go there, for there were only a small minority among them who possessed these qualities. Thus they were delayed there, waiting while the lacking ones strived and struggled to achieve the qualities needed for the journey. So that everyone would be fit to go to the tree. Then, when everyone had achieved the needed qualities, everyone simultaneously came to a shared awareness, and they all agreed on one route to follow to reach the tree, and they all went.

And I (the hunchback), was also there with them. I said to them, "I can bring you to the tree. For that tree has no place at all, for it is entirely beyond place, whereas the aspect of the small which holds the great still has some connection to place. For in any case, it takes up some space, only that it is a very small space which contains much within it. But it is a space nevertheless. However, the aspect of the small which holds the great which I possess, is at the complete end of space, beyond which there is no space at all. Therefore, I can take you all to the tree, which is beyond place entirely (for this hunchback was like the connection-point between "place" and "beyond place". For he possesed the uttermost extent of the "small which holds the great", the aspect of the absolute end of place, beyond which there is not an iota of place at all. For from this point and beyond is the aspect of "beyond place" entirely. Thus, he could take them out of the realm of place, to the realm of "beyond place".) So I took them, and brought them there, to the tree.

Thus, I have the testimony from that band of people, that I have the uttermost quality of the "small which holds the great". (This is why he appeared a hunchback, for he carried a great weight, for he was the aspect of the "small which holds the great".) And now I give this to you as a gift, that you will be like me." And there was great joy and abounding gladness there.

On the sixth day they were also joyful. And they longed, "How can we bring the beggar without hands here?" And behold, he appeared, saying "Here I am! Look, I have come to the wedding." He continued as the others had spoken, and kissed them, saying, "You think that I am blemished in my hands? I am not blemished at all. In truth, I have the full use of my hands, it is only that I do not use the power in my hands in this world. For I need that power for another matter. And I have testimony to this from the Castle of Water.

"For one time, several people sat together. Each one gloried in the power of his hands. One said that he had such and such might in his hands, and another said he had another specific might in his hands. And so each one boasted of the might in his hands. For one boasted that he had this power: That when he shoots an arrow, he can cause it to return to him. For he has the power in his hands, that even after he has already shot the arrow, he can still bring it back to him. I was also there, and I asked him, "What kind of arrow can you bring back?" For there are ten types of arrows, and ten types of poison. For when one wants to shoot an arrow, he dips the tip in a certain poison. And there are ten types of poison. When one dips the arrow in one poison, it damages thus, and when one dips it in another poison, it damages more severely. Thus there are ten poisons, each more deadly than the one before, and that is what is meant by "ten types of arrows". For the arrows themselves are all the same. However, because of the various poisons applied to them, which are ten in number, they are referred to as the "ten types of arrows". Thus, I asked him which kind of arrow he could retrieve. I also asked him, if he could only bring back the arrow before it reached its target, or also after? He answered, "Even after the arrow reaches its mark, I can retrieve it." As to which type of arrow he could retrieve, he answered, "I can retrieve such and such an arrow." I said to him, "If so, you cannot heal the Princess, for you can only retrieve one type of arrow. Therefore, you cannot heal the Princess."

Another one boasted of having this power in his hands: Everyone from whom he takes and receives, he gives to him. (That is to say, in his taking and receiving, in that itself he gives. For his receiving is giving.) So he is inevitably a great giver of charity. I asked him, "What type of charity do you give (for there are ten types of charity)?" He answered that he gives tithes. I answered, "If that is so, you cannot heal the Princess. For you cannot come to her place at all. For you can only penetrate one of the walls that surround her. Thus, you cannot reach her place."

One boasted of having this power in his hands. For there are appointed ones in the world, and each one needs wisdom. And this one who spoke said that with his hands, he can bestow wisdom on them, by laying his hands on them. I asked him, "Which wisdom can you bestow with your hands?" He answered, "Such and such a wisdom." I said to him, "If so, then you cannot heal the Princess. For you cannot know her pulse. For you can only know one pulse. For there are ten varieties of pulse (and you can only know one pulse, for you can only bestow one wisdom with your hands)."

One boasted that he had such a power in his hands, that when a storm wind arises, he can block it with his hands, and adjust the force of the wind, so that it will blow to the appropriate degree. I asked him, "Which wind can you grasp with your hands?" For there are ten types of winds. He answered, "Such and such a wind." I answered, "If so, you cannot heal the Princess. For you can only play one melody before her. For there are ten types of melody, and melody is what will heal her. But you can only play one of the ten melodies." Then everyone asked me, "What is your ability?" I answered, "I can do what the rest of you cannot. That is, the remaining nine parts that you cannot achieve (from each of the previous examples), I can achieve."

For there is a story: Once there was a king who desired a princess, and tried various schemes to capture her. Until he succeeded in capturing her.

One time the King dreamed that she came upon him and murdered him. He awoke, and the dream embedded itself in his heart. He called to all his dream interpreters, and they interpreted the dream according to the simple meaning. They told him that the dream would come to pass, and she would murder him. The King could not find a solution what to do with her. To kill her he could not bear. To send her away would vex him, for another man would take her. That would madden him, for he had sought after her with such effort, and now she would go to another man. Also, if he sent her away and she joined with another, the dream of her killing him could certainly come to pass, for she would be with another. To hold her in his charge he feared to do, because of the dream. So he did not know what to do with her. In the meantime, his love for her slowly crumbled, because of the dream, and all the time it withered more. And also her love for him soured more and more, until she came to hate him, and fleed from him.

The King sent servants to search for her. They returned to him, saying that she was near a Castle of Water. For there is a Castle of Water, and it has ten walls, one inside the other, all of them of water. Even the floor one treads on inside the castle is made of water. There are trees bearing fruits there, all made of water. And the beauty and novelty of the castle does not need to be told. For it is undoubtedly a very awesome novelty, being that it is made out of water. And it is impossible to enter this castle. For one who attempted to enter would drown, for it is entirely of water.

Now, after fleeing, the Princess came to this Castle. She began circling its perimeter. It was told to the King that she was circling the castle. So the King and his soldiers went to capture her. When she saw them approaching, she decided to run into the castle. For she preferred drowning in the water over being caught by the King, and having to be with him. Besides, perhaps she would survive, and manage to enter the castle. When the King saw that she was escaping into the water, he decided, considering the situation, to tell his men to shoot at her. And if she died, she died. They shot at her, and she was struck by all the ten types of arrows with the ten varieties of poison. She escaped thus into the castle, and passed through the gates of the ten walls of water. For there are gates within those walls. And she passed through all the ten walls of the Castle of Water. Until she reached the innermost chamber and collapsed, remaining in a state of great weakness. And I heal her (that is, the one without hands).

For one who does not have the ten types of charity cannot enter the ten walls of the castle, for he would drown in the water. Thus, the King and his soldiers chased after her, and drowned in the water. And I can enter all the ten walls of water. Now, these ten walls of water are the waters of the sea that stood as a wall. And the winds are those that piled up the waters of the sea and held them upright. And these waves which are the ten walls, they stand there at all times. Yet it is the winds that stand them upright. And I can enter all ten walls, and I can retrieve from her all the ten types of arrows. And I know all the ten varieties of pulse through my ten fingers. For with each of my ten fingers, I can trace a specific pulse from among the ten pulses, and I can heal her through the ten varieties of melody. So I heal her. Therefore, you see that I have this power in my hands. Now I am giving it to you as a wedding gift." And there was overwhelming joy and gladness there.

This story is very hard for me to tell. However, since I have started to tell it, I must finish it.

Notes:

This story has not one letter in it without intention. One who is learned can perceive some of the hints. For example, the one who could shoot arrows and bring them back as well, has its basis in a passage from Deuteronomy 32, "My hand grasps in judgment." Rashi comments, "Flesh and blood shoots an arrow, and cannot return it. But the Holy One Blessed be He, shoots and returns."

The one who could grasp winds in his hands, this is hinted at in Proverbs 30: "Who gathered the winds in the palm of His hand."

The ten types of melody and the ten pulses, are discussed in Likutey Tinyana, Chapter 24. Note the relation to the Tikkun Klalli, the set of ten Psalms Rabbi Nachman proscribed for repairing seminal emissions. Each of the ten is related to one of the ten types of melody from which the Book of Psalms is composed.

We did not merit to hear the end of the story, what happened on the seventh day, with the beggar without feet. He said he would not reveal it, and this is a great loss, for we will not merit to hear it until the coming of the Messiah, speedily in our days, Amen.

He also said, "Even if I knew nothing else aside from this story, it would also be a very great novelty."

The story also speaks about several ancient holy sages, among them King David. The "Heart of the World" in the story of the Heart and the Spring, refers to him. For he stood at the edge of the world, and cried out to the Spring that flows out of the Rock on the Temple Mount. As it is said in Psalms, Chap. 61, "From the ends of the earth I call, with a pining heart. To a mountain beyond my reach, lead me."

Examine Psalms Chap. 61 carefully, and you will find in it many references to the story of the Heart and the Spring. "Add days onto the days of the King." For the Spring continually needs another day to be added to its days. "Thus I will sing to Your Name forever, to fulfill my vows every day." For every day he gives it, he comes with songs and melodies. "I will take shelter under the cover of Your wings." For when the Heart needs to rest, a great bird comes and spreads its wings over it.

Who can describe or relate, who can estimate the smallest part of the tremendous revelations that flow out of the awesome secrets contained in this story. It is brimming with hidden meaning from beginning to end. Those with clear perception will find good revelations from the hints, each according to his capacity.



Note: These stories were posted on NaNach.net with both the permissions of Rafi Nanach from Moharan.com and the translator Dovid Nanach. Stories are for personal use only. If you wish to reprint or distribute this translation, we can not give you permission. For that you must contact the above parties.